Students in Dan McGehee's Autonomous Vehicles class experience collision avoidance technology in one of the UI's research vehicles.
Students in Dan McGehee's Autonomous Vehicles class experience collision avoidance technology in one of the UI's automated research vehicles.

University of Iowa students

We work with University of Iowa students in all phases of their college careers. From graphics design to program development to mechanics to working with research participants, our students are invaluable to our work, and they receive an educational experience that leads to a lifetime of success in a variety of fields. 

If you are a University of Iowa student interested in working with us, contact Daniel McGehee, PhD, professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering and director of the National Advanced Driving Simulator, at daniel-mcgehee@uiowa.edu.

High school students

We also offer internships to high school students. To learn more, visit the Workplace Learning Connection website.

Graduate students

We work with undergraduates, graduates, and post-docs, but a few of our recent graduate students are highlighted here.

Thomas Burt

Thomas Burt

Q: What brought you to the National Advanced Driving Simulator? 

A: After taking a semester off to recover from a car crash, I took Professor McGehee’s Autonomous Vehicles course and learned about NADS research. The idea of traffic safety research was especially appealing given my personal experience, and after a fantastic summer internship at NADS, the rest is history. 

Q: What do you work on and what do you hope to do in the future? 

A: I am doing research on impaired driving and modeling. I hope to get into the automotive industry, applying my interests of coding, design, and statistical analysis. 

Joy Kim

Joy (Jimin) Kim

Q: What is your research focused on? 

A: I'm focused on transfer of learning. As the technology in a vehicle develops, the safety concern about it is increasing as well. When the driver changes their car or when the system is updated, safety issues arise becase of the knowledge gap between the old and new systems. By researching the transfer of training, I hope to mitigate drivers' confusion and help them use the system safely.  

Emily Shull

Emily Shull

Q: What brought you to the National Advanced Driving Simulator? 

A: As an undergraduate in psychology, I came across the NADS and realized that my fascination with psychology could be applied to a much broader context, potentially influencing the way we design and implement automation into our lives. 

Q: What do you work on and hope to do in the future? 

A: My research involves evaluating effective ways of maintaining a user’s attention and awareness while in an automated vehicle. Ideally, I would like to continue my research for a broader transportation safety organization that is able to implement guidelines for design and production of automated vehicles.